There is only one way to really understand animal behaviour, and that is to spend months and months patiently observing and learning not just about them, but from them. As I did with the chimpanzees. And Jim and Jamie Dutcher have done just that, living for years with the wolves of the Sawtooth Pack in a tented camp in the Idaho wild. In this compelling book they share with us the insights gained by hours and hours of study, providing us with a window through which we can learn about the world of a family of wolves. If you ever doubted that wolves have rich emotional lives those doubts will be swept away as you read about the close bonds between the members of this pack, how they care for each other, and how they cooperate. In many ways they are like us: clearly they experience emotions of joy and grief and suffering just as we do. They are so intelligent, so in harmony with the natural world that they have much to teach us. How tragic that the wolf, ancestor of the domestic dogs with whom we share our lives, is so misunderstood. I believe that this book, so compelling in its authenticity, will help you understand why I feel shocked and saddened by the way that wolves are misunderstood and persecuted. And you will, I am sure, want to join the fight to protect them.

Jane Goodall, DBE, PhD
Founder - the Jane Goodall Institute 
& UN Messenger of Peace

There is only one way to really understand animal behaviour, and that is to spend months and months patiently observing and learning not just about them, but from them. As I did with the chimpanzees. And Jim and Jamie Dutcher have done just that, living for years with the wolves of the Sawtooth Pack in a tented camp in the Idaho wild. In this compelling book they share with us the insights gained by hours and hours of study, providing us with a window through which we can learn about the world of a family of wolves. If you ever doubted that wolves have rich emotional lives those doubts will be swept away as you read about the close bonds between the members of this pack, how they care for each other, and how they cooperate. In many ways they are like us: clearly they experience emotions of joy and grief and suffering just as we do. They are so intelligent, so in harmony with the natural world that they have much to teach us. How tragic that the wolf, ancestor of the domestic dogs with whom we share our lives, is so misunderstood.

I believe that this book, so compelling in its authenticity, will help you understand why I feel shocked and saddened by the way that wolves are misunderstood and persecuted. And you will, I am sure, want to join the fight to protect them.